Happy Father’s Day

In anticipation of Father’s Day, we recently found ourselves discussing our dads. Naturally, as a group of brand enthusiasts, we started reminiscing on our favorite dad ads.

A spot created by Whirlpool resonated with us and connected with some of our favorite dad moments. The spot titled, “Dad and Andy” highlights how being a father doesn’t mean you have to be perfect, but that trying your best is usually more than enough.

In this ad, the story focuses on the relationship between the dad and his son as the father handles the daily activities, with care and a bit of stumbling, of raising a child.

Often we see the brand play the role of the “main character” in a spot. But in this case, the brand plays a supporting role, serving as a reliable helping hand to the father.

Marketers may wonder if the ad could be as effective with the brand in a background role. Our data shows that it was. But, how? This ad is a great example of what can happen when the right emotional structure combines with the right brand placement.

“Dad & Andy” has an “emotional build” – it creates an increasing flow of positive feeling as viewers emotionally follow the father’s quest to be a good parent. This busy father encourages his son by leaving notes for him on the bathroom mirror, in his lunchbox, and in his book. The positive emotion peaks on the payoff moment when the father discovers that “Andy” has returned the encouragement and left him a note – in the freezer. The brand is revealed immediately following this moment, and the Whirlpool brand is given emotional credit for supporting the father. We feel good; Whirlpool is the cause.

A well crafted, well executed, well branded ad doesn’t have to overwhelm the audience with the brand, but the ad needs to combine the right elements in the right order.

As we push into Father’s Day weekend, take some time to celebrate dad and all he does! Happy Father’s Day to all of the dads out there from everyone at Ameritest!

This entry was posted in Brand Awareness, Emotion and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

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